#FriFotos: Symbols

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You’ll find these all over the Moravian countryside.

For almost forty years, the Czech Republic has been a predominantly atheist country. The Soviets discouraged idolatry (with an iron fist, of course) and I suppose Czechs, once free of Communism, had other things to deal with than re-instituting religious doctrine. There are churches in the Czech Republic, temples and other houses of worship, but despite that, only about 19% of citizens believe there is a God.

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I know the symbol is reminiscent of the Eastern Orthodox double cross of the Byzantine era, but it was puzzling as to why such a cross would be found in the Czech Republic. They spoke a Slavic language but their ancestors were predominantly Catholic, or Jewish. Was this cross here before Communism’s quash of religions? Was it placed there during the time, as a symbol of Russian solidarity? Or something that came after?

Our hosts in Slavonice were taking us on a tour of the Czech countryside, showing us remnants of projects under communism that were never finished.

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“They came in to our town, destroyed buildings and homes that had been here for hundreds of years, to replace them with new Soviet constructions,” Zdenek tells us. “But they would run of money, or get bored. So they just stopped.”

He has no knowledge of the double crosses dotted along the Czech countryside. “I think, maybe, they were markers of where towns began, and ended,” he says. “I don’t think they are religious really.

 

3 Comments

  1. Pammy Pam
    Apr 1, 2013

    jak se mate Katka,
    Told you I’d come visit! I happen to be a fan of the Czech Republic; i spend some time there in 2001 before they joined the EU. I LOVE it there! We’ll have to swap stories. Nazdravi!

    • Katka
      Apr 1, 2013

      Ahhhh a fellow Czechophile! Fantastic! I lived there in 2008. Expect some Czech posts for sure during this challenge!

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